RFID tags for Retail

Apply the power of RFID (Radio frequency identification) in your retail environment! RFID technology goes beyond barcode scanning. It automates data collection without the risk of human error. With an RFID handheld scanner, you can read tags simultaneously and without direct line of sight increasing efficiency and productivity in a store.

All RFID tags within range can be tracked and located immediately to ensure the correct location from supply chain to on the floor. Retailers can have access to product information, item location, availability, item level tracking, stock maintenance to ensure greater efficiency and sufficient supply level to meet consumer demand.

Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) are helping retail stores across the country improving customer experience, inventory accuracy, and a way to present wider sets of products to customers who are a little more selective.

RFID Tags have the ability to hold information that identifies the products, its country of origin, materials used, production date, the handling process, and any other important information that took place in the supply chain. Some retailers are using RFID tagging to track products at all of their locations.

According to the RFID Lab, manufacturers using RFID tagging will see an 80 percent improvement in shipping and picking accuracy, at the same time being able to increase the receiving time by 90 percent. This will allow retailers to communicate more efficiently with their manufacturers for expedited reorders, improved planning, and forecasting of products.

Improve Warehouse Tracking with RFID Technology

Radio-frequency identification technology, better known as RFID, is incredibly popular in the warehouse industry. The concept is simple: a small RFID tag is attached to each pallet. Special devices can read the information stored on these tags, allowing the pallet to be tracked wherever it is.

Unlike barcodes, the device doesn’t have to be pointed at the tag at all and can read tags from several feet away. This is just one of the many reasons why warehouses are making the switch to RFID technology. Here are a few of the other ways your warehouse can improve its pallet tracking by incorporating RFID technology in your warehouse tracking system.

It Provides a lot of Information
RFID tags can do more than just provide identification for a pallet. The tag can actually hold around 2KB of information. That may seem like a very small amount, but it’s actually a lot of basic text. While a barcode usually has no more than 12 digits that identify it, RFID tags can include information like pallet size, weight, origination, final destination, etc. Once the pallet has reached its destination, the tag is removed and can be reprogrammed for use on another pallet. Other types of pallet identification are one-use only—new barcodes, for example, have to be printed for every new pallet.

Automatic Inventory Modification
One of the biggest advantages of using RFID technology is in receiving. Because an RFID device doesn’t have to be pointed at the tag, the device can be set up automatically to read and log any tag that moves past it. Warehouses set up an RFID reader by each receiving dock, and as a pallet goes past, its tag is automatically read and the information logged in the warehouse’s inventory. There’s no longer any worry that someone will miss scanning a pallet. The time it takes to scan and log pallets can be dramatically reduced. Another device can be placed at each outgoing dock to track pallets leaving the warehouse.

Managing Pallets
Because the RFID tags can be dynamically changed, it’s much easier to keep track of where all of the pallets in your warehouse are. When a pallet is moved to a different area, its warehouse shelving information is updated. Then it’s easy to check the master inventory system to see where a pallet is. The warehouse can even be covered in RFID readers to allow for real time tracking—an interactive map can show the location of every RFID tag in the inventory, even those being moved.

A Secure Supply Chain
If the manufacturer tags pallets with an RFID tag before they even leave the factory, it’s easy to track every stop a pallet makes before it reaches the customer. This allows for much more accurate information to be sent to every warehouse and trucker between the origination and final destination. It can also be used to guarantee food really did go from farm to table or that products aren’t being sold past their expiration date.

You need to know these question before you Choose a right rfid system

A RFID system is made up of RFID tags,RFID readers, and software that collect and record data with little or no human involvement. Systems may also include barcodes, biometrics, voice recognition and robotics to complement the system. Each system is customized to the enterprise it serves, usually through a RFID integrator, but basically, each system connects assets to tags to an ID database.

An initial consideration when you are considering a RFID system must be about the kind of monitoring you need. Some questions to ask yourself are:
* Do you need real time monitoring?
* Is your environment a high speed environment?
* Are the assets surveyed going to be a long distance from the reader?
* Are some asset positions impossible to place in the direct sight of a reader?
* Do you need a tight layer of security?
* What is your price point?
* How large is the area you want to cover?
* Do you want to monitor points of congestion or zones?
* Is the asset you’re monitoring an expensive item?
* How precise does your data need to be?
* How much data storage do you need?

Can OPP IOT UHF tags work on metal?

Can OPP IOT UHF tags work on metal?

UHF tags on metal
UHF tags on metal

When an RFID reader scans a tag, it sends a radio-frequency electromagnetic field that powers the tag (passive tags) and allows the RFID reader to communicate with the tag. The problem arises when the RFID tag is fixed to a conductive surface, such as metal. The conductive surface alters the electromagnetic field created by the RFID reader so that the RFID tag isn’t able to use the electromagnetic field to communicate with the reader.

OPP IOT on metal uhf tags are embedded with a sheet of ferrite that is placed between the RFID tag and the adhesive backing of the tag. The ferrite works to reduce the amount of interference caused by the metal (or other conductive) surface. Ferrite is an iron-containing, ceramic-like material with unique magnetic properties that result in a high magnetic permeability and high electrical resistance.

So OPP IOT UHF tags can work well on metal surface and metal object.

Why Anti-Metal RFID Tags?

Before you understand the problem, you need to understand how RFID tags work — When an RFID reader scans a tag, it sends a radio-frequency electromagnetic field that powers the tag (passive tags) and allows the RFID reader to communicate with the tag. The problem arises when the RFID tag is fixed to a conductive surface, such a s metal. The conductive surface alters the electromagnetic field created by the RFID reader so that the RFID tag isn’t able to use the electromagnetic field to communicate with the reader.

Anti-metal RFID tags Solution above problem
Anti-metal RFID tags are embedded with a sheet of ferrite that is placed between the RFID tag and the adhesive backing of the tag. The ferrite works to reduce the amount of interference caused by the metal (or other conductive) surface. Ferrite is an iron-containing, ceramic-like material with unique magnetic properties that result in a high magnetic permeability and high electrical resistance.

Can RFID tags be read by all RFID readers?

No, not all RFID tags can be read by all RFID readers.

There are many different ISO standards, protocols, and physical differences between various RFID tag types. For the purposes of this explanation, we’ll only focus on passive RFID, though there is also semi-active (aka, battery-assisted passive, or BAP) and active RFID. For a little bit of background, here are some examples of how each type of RFID is currently being used.

Passive RFID examples:
Retail clothing tags (UHF)
Access control cards on a college campus (LF or HF)
Running Race bibs (UHF)
Nametags / Badges at conferences (HF)
Asset tracking (UHF)
Animal tagging (LF)

Semi-active RFID examples:
Temperature logging tags
Long range tags (30+ meters)

Active RFID examples:
Toll Road transponders
Military shipping containers

Within passive RFID, there are three main tag / reader technologies on the market today, named after their respective frequency bands: low-frequency (LF, 125 kHz or 134 kHz), high-frequency (HF, 13.56 MHz), and ultra-high-frequency (UHF, 860-960 MHz). Each type of passive RFID tag (LF, HF, or UHF) can only be read by the SAME type of passive RFID reader. For instance, an LF reader will only be able to read an LF tag; it will not able to read an HF or a UHF tag.

Further, within each passive RFID frequency band, there are a handful of ISO standards that need to be followed in order to facilitate reader to tag communication. Here are the major standards for each passive RFID frequency band:

Low Frequency:
ISO 14223
ISO/IEC 18000-2

High Frequency:
ISO 15693
ISO/IEC 14443 A
ISO/IEC 14443 B
ISO/IEC 18092

Ultra High Frequency:
ECPglobal Class1 Gen2 (ISO 18000-6C)

Generally, readers within a certain frequency band (LF, HF, or UHF) can physically support more than one protocol, but require some sort of software changes to do so. However, there is not currently a single radio system that supports the all RFID frequencies and all of the different protocols.

In short, when picking an RFID system, make absolutely sure that your reader and tag technologies are compatible.

RFID Readers

An RFID reader, also known as an interrogator, is a device that provides the connection between the tag data and the enterprise system software that needs the information. The reader communicates with tags that are within its field of operation, performing any number of tasks including simple continuous inventorying, filtering (searching for tags that meet certain criteria), writing (or encoding) to selected tags, etc.

The reader uses an attached antenna to capture data from tags. It then passes the data to a computer for processing. Just like RFID tags, there are many different sizes and types of RFID readers. Readers can be affixed in a stationary position in a store or factory, or integrated into a mobile device such as a portable, handheld scanner. Readers can also be embedded in electronic equipment or devices, and in vehicles.

Alien Higgs 3 CHIP

Higgs-3 is a highly integrated, 800-bit memory, single chip UHF RFID Tag IC.

Alien Higgs-3 chip conforms to the EPC global Class 1 Gen 2 specifications and provides state-of-the-art performance for a broad range of applications.

The read range depends on the environment and the respective country regulations. The allowed frequency band has to be selected. TAG and RFID reader need to be coordinated to each other.

RFID 9 USEFUL FACTS

1. RFID can identify individual objects at rates of over 1 000 tags per second

2. RFID is used in high tech, retail, manufacturing, healthcare, entertainment, and more.

3. RFID tags can be used on liquids and metals.

4. RFID readers can read information from and write information to tags.

5. UHF Gen2 is the fastest growing segment of the RFID market.

6. Taking inventory with an RFID handheld reader is 25x faster than with a barcode reader.

7. The UHF band is 60 times more efficient for RFID operations than the HF band.

8. UHF Gen2 tags are 2 to 3 times less expensive than HF tags because they are easier to manufacture.

9. UHF RFID is currently the only type of RFID to be regulated by a single global standart.

HF RFID tag or UHF RFID tags – Which is better?

There are lots of different applications that use both HF and  UHF RFID tag. And, like most options we have to choose between, each frequency has different pros and cons, so it really depends on what’s important for your specific application.

Below, I’ve provided a kind of assessment that will hopefully help you decide which RFID frequency is most beneficial to your organization. Asking yourself these questions will help give you a better idea of which direction you might want to take. If you are trying to choose between HF and UHF, I would definitely recommend doing some extra research on this topic, but this is a great starting point that will help you quickly understand some of the differences between HF and UHF RFID technology.

1) Do you need the ability to read and write data over a distance greater than ~50 cm?
Yes -> UHF might be a better option, allowing you to transfer data over several meters, while HF can only transfer data up to about 50 cm.
No -> HF might be better for you because its range is shorter, making it more reliable.

2) Will your RFID tags be placed near liquids, metals, carbon substances, or other dielectric and conducting objects?
Yes -> HF would probably work better because it is less vulnerable to interferences from surroundings. However, there are some manufacturers that have designed UHF tags that will work in these environments as well.
No -> HF and UHF would both work well.

3) Do you need to store more than ~110 bytes of data on your RFID tags?
Yes -> HF would probably be better because these tags can store between 64 bytes and 8 kilobytes of data, while UHF tags can only store 24-110 bytes of data.
No -> Both HF and UHF would work—at this point you’d probably want to choose the most cost-effective option.

4) Do you need to read more than 20 RFID tags at one time?
Yes -> UHF might be better for you since it can read up to 200 tags at a time, whereas HF can only read up to 20 tags at a time.
No -> Both HF and UHF would work. However, if you’re planning to narrow down on one tag at a time, HF would probably be better since UHF might pick up multiple readings.

5) Will your tags be located in an area with a high amount of Electromagnetic Interference (EMI)? EMI is emitted by motors, robots on assembly lines, conveyors with nylon belts, etc.
Yes -> HF would probably be best because it is less susceptible to inaccuracies due to EMI.
No -> HF and UHF would both work.

6) Does your application require faster data transfer?
Yes -> UHF would probably be better because it transfers data faster than HF.
No -> HF and UHF would both work.

7) Is power usage an important consideration for your application?
Yes -> HF might be better because it uses less power than UHF.
No -> HF and UHF would both work.

8) Are there inhibiting UHF restrictions in your geographic location that would interfere with your use of UHF RFID?
Yes -> HF might be better because the same HF technology is accepted worldwide, whereas UHF restrictions vary according to region.
No -> HF and UHF would both be fine.

Also,some RFID readers don’t support certain frequencies, so be sure to consider that as well. Hopefully this helped! You may have heard that we now carry RFID readers for our rugged handheld computers, which operate at both HF and UHF. Feel free to contact us to find out more.

If you have any other questions about RFID frequencies, ask away in the comments below.

OPP IOT Technologies CO., LTD.
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